Hostages

What do you think of when you hear the word hostage? Maybe you picture someone being held at gunpoint in a bank robbery or home invasion. Maybe it’s something you heard about in the news. Maybe it’s just a vague concept to you. I used to think of it as a mix of all the above.

Dictionary.com defines hostage as “a person given or held as security for the fulfillment of certain conditions or terms, promises, etc., by another.”  Seems pretty straightforward. But, why am I even discussing hostages?

20170605_021014349_iOSToday is a bad day. A cold has been circulating through the house and today, for the first time in like three weeks, we all mostly felt good. Fevers are gone, congested drainage has slowed (although not totally gone, thanks to spring allergies). C is having a hard time entertaining himself as usual. He has already done the chores of his choosing (he’s not supposed to have a choice but, this is the only way to get him to do anything), and managed to eke out an hour of school on the computer. He wants ‘someone to do something with him’ and yet, he can’t commit to any option presented. He feels negatively about himself. He thinks no one wants to be with him. No one likes him. I do my best to boost his self-esteem, encourage him, and suggest activities that we could do. He, ever intent on defying any positivity, denies or even refuses to acknowledge the encouragement. He refuses to accept any suggestions. We go around and around and get nowhere. At this point, I’m wanting to agree with him that no one wants to be with him because I have nothing left to say. I am beyond frustrated. I just sit there and listen to him whine while drinking my coffee. From an outside perspective, I must look heartless. I’m not though – this conversation breaks my heart.

So, as I sit there, trying to find peace and calm, I decide that we’ve been in the house too long. The weather outside is beautiful and perfect for a walk. I change out of my house clothes, in an attempt to look presentable. E loves the idea, and runs off to get ready. The dogs are going nuts, they can sense that fun is about to happen.  But, C is not having it. He does not want to go.

temper-tantrum

He hides himself under a desk in the office, crying that he doesn’t want to go. When I try to talk to him he just moans at me. He hides his face. He pulls at his hair and cries. I try my best not to respond with the anger and frustration I feel. That makes the situation worse. I try to bribe him: we’ll just walk a short walk. He can ride his bike instead of walk. We’ll walk to the donut shop for a fresh donut. I just really want to get outside. He won’t respond. I mention that it’s something we are all doing together and we want to spend time with him. Nothing. Crickets. Well no, not really. He’s still crying, but he’s ignoring me.

So, I flop into a chair and dive into mindless iPad games for a few moments to readjust my attitude. I’m furious, but I can’t direct it at him. When he feels that he is being “yelled at” or disciplined in any way, it sends him into a spiral. In fact, often, just trying to talk to him makes matters worse so, I tend to wait him out.

beanAt this point, E steps in and tries to mediate the situation. Often, he is the only one that can get through to C in these moments. Conflict makes E uncomfortable, and he knows how anxiety makes him feel which he thinks helps him understand how to help C. Sometimes it drives me nuts that he parents his brother better than I can in those moments but, mostly, I’m very appreciative of his help. He just has this way about him that 4 out of 5 times will resolve the situation and smooth things over. He might negotiate a deal with us to make C happy, or he will do something to make him laugh. It really is amazing and I’m grateful.

About a week ago, I meet with a new psychologist that will be doing a formal mental health evaluation for Mr. C. For quite some time we have been struggling with his behavior, and are desperately trying to get to the bottom of his issues and needs. The issues may be “as simple as” anxiety (I use quotes here because I know that anxiety is not easy) but, it could also be a key piece that helps us understand his already complex puzzle. So far, he has been diagnosed as Gifted, 2E, ADHD, SPD, ODD as well as having GI issues. The frustrating thing is that what one doctor says is an issue, another disagrees with. It’s confusing and stressful. We see in C behaviors that we previously dealt with in E, yet the tools we successfully used with him don’t work for C. Our “Mr. C Toolbox” is empty. So, we keep digging.

But I digress. I meet with this new psychologist for a pre-evaluation meeting. This is standard procedure in these cases. The parent(s) meet with the doctor to talk candidly and frankly about the issues without the child overhearing and their feelings being hurt as the parent vents. As I sit there, explaining how things have gotten to a breaking point in our home, she asks me: “So, it’s basically like you are a hostage in your own home, wouldn’t you agree?”

1561Say what? I hadn’t thought of it like that. My mind was blown! I was racing through my historical knowledge of our situation and making comparisons.

“Yes! Yes, that’s exactly how it feels!”

Our conversation moved forward and we sat for 3 hours discussing everything. By far, this was the most thorough intake interview we’ve had yet.  I’m excited to see how this evaluation proceeds.532353

Since that word was mentioned, I can’t stop thinking about it. I’m a hostage in my own home, and it’s not fun. Granted, I’m not actually being held at the threat of violence but, some days, it feels like it.

Today, the chaos was calmed by E offering to play Minecraft with him and I did not get my walk. The dogs are pouting. The boys sit in the other room, calmly building houses and exploring together. Meanwhile, I sit here, held hostage by a child that has demand avoidance and cannot help himself, but makes life miserable for those around him. I’m looking for ways to break out of this situation and wondering when the next crisis will arise and what small insignificant thing will be the cause. Most of all though, I’m hoping to see a light at the end of the tunnel.

 

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Categories: ADHD, Autism, Humor, ODD, Parenting, SPD

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